BEWARE OF VEGETABLE OILS SUCH AS CANOLA OIL


Beware of vegetable oils such as canola oil

We all consume canola oil and other similar vegetable oils.  Confusion about the health value of vegetable oils exists that I would like to clear up for you. Our government tells us that these vegetable oils are good for us because they are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and not saturated oils. They want us to believe that saturated fats are categorically bad for you. The problem with that is, the scientific literature says otherwise. Let me explain further.

How do we get vegetable oils? Vegetable oils are made from seeds such as rapeseed (canola oil) soybean (soybean oil), corn, sunflower, safflower, and others. Since the 1900s we have developed fairly complicated extraction processes to chemically remove these oils in which they also get deodorized, bleached and refined—far from a ‘whole food,’ yet promoted as healthy by the American Heart Association.  You’ll find these in most all processed food.

Canola oil may have omega-3 fatty acids to begin with, but high-heat processing denatures it, dramatically increasing the trans fat content. Watch this nearly 4-minute YouTube on how rapeseeds become canola oil: https://youtu.be/omjWmLG0EAs.

According to the American Heart Association, these are “common cooking oils that contain more of the better-for-you fats and less saturated fat”: Canola Corn Olive Peanut Safflower Soybean Sunflower

They advise to replace “bad fats (saturated and trans)…solid fats (butter, shortening, lard and hard stick margarine) and tropical oils (palm and coconut oil), with healthier fats” such as vegetable oils!  Therefore, it isn’t just trans fats found in cookies and processed baked goods that you need to avoid, its vegetable oil too!

It’s no coincidence that obesity and heart-disease rates have dramatically increased since Americans began eating vegetable oils instead of fats like butter.

Contrast these with coconut oil or even good old butter from cow’s milk, which only require a simple separation. Yes, these fats do contain saturated fat, but saturated fat is not the disease-promoting culprit we were originally told it was decades ago. The science is pretty clear on this.